The economist J.K. Galbraith once wrote, “Faced with a choice between changing one’s mind and proving there is no need to do so, almost everyone gets busy with the proof.”


Leo Tolstoy was even bolder: “The most difficult subjects can be explained to the most slow-witted man if he has not formed any idea of them already; but the simplest thing cannot be made clear to the most intelligent man if he is firmly persuaded that he knows already, without a shadow of doubt, what is laid before him.”


What’s going on here? Why don’t facts change our minds? And why would someone continue to believe a false or inaccurate idea anyway? How do such behaviors serve us?

The Logic of False Beliefs

Humans need a reasonably accurate view of the world in order to survive. If your model of reality is wildly different from the actual world, then you struggle to take effective actions each day.


However, truth and accuracy are not the only things that matter to the human mind. Humans also seem to have a deep desire to belong.


In Atomic Habits, I wrote, “Humans are herd animals. We want to fit in, to bond with others, and to earn the respect and approval of our peers. Such inclinations are essential to our survival. For most of our evolutionary history, our ancestors lived in tribes. Becoming separated from the tribe—or worse, being cast out—was a death sentence.”


Understanding the truth of a situation is important, but so is remaining part of a tribe. While these two desires often work well together, they occasionally come into conflict.


In many circumstances, social connection is actually more helpful to your daily life than understanding the truth of a particular fact or idea. The Harvard psychologist Steven Pinker put it this way, “People are embraced or condemned according to their beliefs, so one function of the mind may be to hold beliefs that bring the belief-holder the greatest number of allies, protectors, or disciples, rather than beliefs that are most likely to be true.”


We don’t always believe things because they are correct. Sometimes we believe things because they make us look good to the people we care about.


I thought Kevin Simler put it well when he wrote, “If a brain anticipates that it will be rewarded for adopting a particular belief, it’s perfectly happy to do so, and doesn’t much care where the reward comes from — whether it’s pragmatic (better outcomes resulting from better decisions), social (better treatment from one’s peers), or some mix of the two.”


False beliefs can be useful in a social sense even if they are not useful in a factual sense. For lack of a better phrase, we might call this approach “factually false, but socially accurate.” When we have to choose between the two, people often select friends and family over facts.


This insight not only explains why we might hold our tongue at a dinner party or look the other way when our parents say something offensive, but also reveals a better way to chang e the minds of others.

Thread Status
I'm grateful for having instaforum

You’ve reached the end of replies

Looks like you are new here. Register with InstaForum Income, learn, contribute and earn ₦5,000, ₦20,000, and even up to ₦1,000,000 consistently with us.



HOMEFAQs | InstaForum | Contact Us  | About Us | Advertise With Us | Terms & Condition | Privacy Policy | Disclaimer | Comments Policy

Download the InstaForum App

InstaForum.com.ng (InstaForum) is a social news platform, online community where learning and earning takes place,

meet great minds and discuss at the same time make cool cash thereby bringing encouragement to us.

(c) 2019 - 2021 | All Rights Reserved | InstaForum  | HIPPO BUSINESS CENTRE ENTERPRISE | Company Registration Number: BN2671904 | InstaForum Income